Dogs With Braces, Dental Health in Dogs

Dogs with braces are just one of the questions that many of our visitors ask us. Dogs with braces, we explain in detail. Let’s not forget the health of our little friends.

From a cosmetic problem to serious consequences for the dog’s health, misaligned teeth can be of different severity and require treatment. An under- or overbite or the misalignment of one or more teeth change the pressure conditions in the mouth with corresponding consequences: If, for example, the tips of the lower fangs (canine) are shifted inwards, there is constant pressure on the hard palate. The bite holes are often inflamed. However, the biggest problem is that jaw growth is inhibited by a bite and remains a permanent problem.

Teeth that are tilted, twisted, displaced or placed completely incorrectly are also problematic. The unnatural wear and tear (abrasion) lead to tooth enamel damage and pain caused by incorrect pressure conditions. In the end, there may be inflammation of the gums, shrinkage of gums and/or jawbones and thus loosening and falling out of the teeth or a necessary extraction, i.e. the pulling of one or more teeth.

Correction of misaligned teeth: The dog braces

Such malpositions should be corrected as early as possible. The sooner the problem is resolved, and the younger the animal, the easier and faster a correction using dog braces or other methods is possible since the bones are still remodelled due to the growth. The misaligned teeth are often congenital, i.e. the causes are genetic, that is, they are already visible in the young dog, e.g. excess teeth, deciduous teeth that have not failed or jaw malformations.

As with humans, there are also braces or other appliances for orthodontic treatment in dogs. With the help of these methods, teeth in the jaw, for example, can be realigned and thus integrated into the healthy row of teeth. There are different systems of dog braces.

Dog braces made of brackets and chain:

Elastic-plastic or rubber chains can be stretched from one tooth to the next or even to the jaw. So-called brackets (also: brackets), metal or plastic plates, are attached to the desired teeth. A loop of the chain can also be used at the tip of a canine. The tooth is prepared for this (including cleaned and roughened), then the brackets are glued on. The elastic-plastic chains put tension on the tooth, which moves it piece by piece in the right direction. Instead of attaching the second bracket to a tooth, an anchor can be placed in the jaw with a bone screw to absorb the tension. The chain is re-tensioned regularly. After about 4-6 weeks, the tooth has reached the desired position, and the appliance can be removed.

Dog braces as bite splint:

So-called bite splints made of plastic or metal can also be used to correct, for example, lower canines that are too steep, but their manufacture is somewhat more complex. A plaster cast of the dog’s mouth is often made first. Then the individual braces are made in the dental laboratory, optionally also in metal. This is glued into the upper jaw with a special plastic or attached with wire clips. Each time she chews, she puts pressure on the tooth and brings it into the right position. Adjustment is neither necessary nor possible. There is also the option of modelling the dog braces directly in the mouth, which works particularly well with minor corrections. Larger plates, on the other hand, are more likely to be produced in the laboratory, after approx.

Dog braces: expansion screw

Another possibility is the so-called expansion screws. A metal screw with widened ends and eyelets for wire looping around the teeth is inserted and glued in the middle between the lower canine teeth and moved outwards. The screw is tightened using a key and readjusted every few days. This can be done at the vet, but sometimes the owner can do it himself after precise instruction and regular checks. The pressure is initially very high after the setting and then gradually decreases over time. After the correct tooth position has been reached, the screw remains in the mouth for a while without being set again to secure the new position of the teeth by means of bone remodelling.

How can I tell if my dog needs braces?

This is only possible if you regularly look into the mouth of a young dog. However, since specialist knowledge is required for this, it is advisable to keep the appointments given by the veterinarian for dental checks. It usually makes sense to have a check-up as soon as the dog has started to change milk teeth.

Dog braces: Which is the right one and how long does my dog ​​have to wear?

It is important for all tooth corrections that the desired direction and the required tensile forces are precisely known. The right contact person is a specialist veterinarian. Depending on the dog’s age and the problem, the choice of system and the length of time the brace remains in the dog’s mouth vary. For this, the vet will examine the dog in detail.


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How can I tell if my dog needs braces?

This is only possible if you regularly look into the mouth of a young dog. However, since specialist knowledge is required for this, it is advisable to keep the appointments given by the veterinarian for dental checks. It usually makes sense to have a check-up as soon as the dog has started to change milk teeth.

Dog braces: Which is the right one and how long does my dog ​​have to wear?

It is important for all tooth corrections that the desired direction and the required tensile forces are precisely known. The right contact person is a specialist veterinarian. Depending on the dog’s age and the problem, the choice of system and the length of time the brace remains in the dog’s mouth vary. For this, the vet will examine the dog in detail.

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